Review: Dana Reinhardt – Tell Us Something True

Tell Us Something True
Dana Reinhardt

Having just been dumped unceremoniously in the middle of a romantic paddle on a lake, River is feeling a bit down. When he sees a sign promoting what he thinks is a normal meeting, he ends up faking a weed addiction to stay in the teenage support group as he connects with a girl who is somehow out of his league. What will happen when his lies fall apart?

29663842Having just read a novel where there is a difference between nice guys and good guys, River makes a good contrast of it. He starts out nice, passes through completely useless, then maybe to good. It’s that character evolution of being just another guy to being one who has gotten a bit of self-awareness happening.

I totally did not see that connection coming! Obviously I can’t give it away, but it’s pretty damn good. River gets away with a lot of stuff because he’s always been a ‘good son’, but damn, I was a good daughter and I never got away with that much! I can empathise with a lot of what River goes through (including taking a long time to get his driver’s licence), which is probably why this novel ranked so highly with me.

I’m going to compare this novel to Girls Love Travis Walker, and that makes this novel a reread – worth 5 stars from me. Amazing that a young adult novel which could be seen as a bit whiney got my vote of confidence.

5star

ONE WORLD | August 2016 | AU $16.99 | Paperback

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Review: Kiersten White – And I Darken

And I Darken
Kierstan White

Lada has been ruthless from the day she was born. Destined to be a boy, but born a weakling girl, Lada knows that the only way up in the world is to be hard and cruel. When she and her brother are sent off as hostages, Lada sees it as both exile and freedom.

25324111I wanted to like this novel, I really did. But instead it reminded me of Ruined, without the magic. Or maybe Red Queen, which also has that whole creeping up on the throne thing. Have I lost my touch, and I only love fantasy novels again? I don’t think so…

Apparently this is based on the Ottoman empire and Vlad the Impaler, but I didn’t realise that until later. The Ottoman empire sounded familiar, but if you’ve been reading my blog for a while, I’m certain you would remember that I’m not all that great at history or geography.

I finished this novel with a sense of having slogged through a hard read. I then complained to my partner that it felt like I had wasted my time. It’s not badly written, but the story and characters lack a spark that would have made the novel better. For that reason, I’m giving it a rather miserable 2 stars. Spend your reading time elsewhere.

2star

Penguin Random House | 28 June 2016 | AU $19.99 | Paperback

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Review: Claire Hennessy – Nothing Tastes as Good

Nothing Tastes as Good
Claire Hennessy

Annabel didn’t know what to expect when she dies, but it wasn’t coming back to fix another girl’s life. Julia is fat and initially that’s all Annabel can see to fix. Slowly Julia teaches Annabel about other things in life, while Annabel helps Julia in her own ghostly helper way.

28101625I really like how the story develops with only hints of Annabel’s problems. It keeps the reader interested, and then invested in both of the characters. Julia too takes some time to get used to, and most of the time I found myself sympathising with her and wishing that she had more guts!

Gavin is actually surprising bright in picking up clues. He’s slow (a bit like all teenage boys it seems), but Julia is pretty good at hiding things.The theme that comes through is the importance of having friends, real friends, to help you survive the most stressful periods of your life. 

There is a lot of negative body shaming here, but at the same time it is balanced out by what Annabel can see going on in other’s heads. There’s also the sensitive references to rape, or potential rape. Approach with caution if you are easily triggered, but enjoy anyway because of the ending.

I’m going to take a leap here, and give it 5 stars. I have a feeling that I’m going to want to read it again when I want something with a complicated ending and complicated real feelings that have conclusions.

5star

 Bonnier | August 2016 | AU $19.99 | Paperback

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Interview with Darrell Drake

authorAn Interview with Darrell Drake, author of A Star-Reckoner’s Lot

I’m not going to be reviewing your newest novel, but from your other published novels, is there one that is your own personal favourite?

There’s actually little struggle in choosing. Where Madness Roosts is the victor when it comes to my first three books. It’s only a novella, and is the only one not to have a print release. Still, it’s far and away my favorite. The limited third-person perspective gave me the liberty to explore its protagonists, and channel through them something like a more down-to-earth Alice in Wonderland. All the while revealing some of their backstory, and that of another more mysterious character that would enter their lives both again and for the first time years later. Cryptic, I know.

I both love and hate novels that don’t leave a discrete ending for the reader. Have you ever felt the need to write sequels?

Despite having written a series that comprises three books all with the same characters, I make an effort to avoid writing anything with a cliffhanger. I don’t think it’s necessarily a bad thing, having a cliffhanger or such, especially in something like a trilogy that’s clearly been broken up because of its length. But I’d rather readers put down my novels with a sense of closure. The story as far as that book is considered is finished. There may be other stories—sequels even—but the book is meant to stand on its own.

51zSWOzg-HLThere’s always another novel in the pipeline to write… Tell me about it! Does it have even a working title?

Uh oh. I think I may be in trouble. I, uh, don’t have anything in the pipeline. I know I should, but, uh, you see . . . I don’t. The last few years have been dominated by A Star-Reckoner’s Lot. Creatively and otherwise, it has demanded my attention. Between research, writing, two Kickstarters, and everything in between, I haven’t been able to focus on anything else.

Some advice other writers have given is that your first novel is best sitting in a drawer for a while, because then you feel stronger about chopping up ‘your baby’. Do you still have a copy of your first novel? Whether this was published or unpublished, I need to know!

I do, and I can’t say I disagree. Sage advice indeed. Knowing what I know now, I would have left it in some quiet drawer. Hindsight and all. I stand by it nevertheless. Within Ruin is a worthy tale, even if it wears some of the trappings of a first novel. I think I have the very first print proof around here somewhere. That was a mess that has since been severely polished. I’d purge the first edition if I could.

Do you have a dedicated writing space? How does it meet your writing needs?

I mainly write at my desk, on my computer, which is about as distracting as you can imagine. Were I to write somewhere like the couch, I’d fall asleep without question. But the desk suits my needs, typically with my brilliant cat Merill nearby. Nothing special, really. If I need a change of scenery, I’ll go outside and sit on a bench somewhere. When I was writing A Star-Reckoner’s Lot that bench was at the quiet end of a dying mall. It wasn’t particularly scenic, but it served its purpose. Mainly, I need to be left alone.

What is your writing process? Have you ever thought about changing it? Other authors I have interviewed talk about having an outline – post-it notes in an office, or writing in paper journals. Is there something like that in your writing technique? Or is it all digital for you?

I mainly write the novel digitally, though exceptions are made when I’m writing away from the computer. Journals, then. I’ll use those same journals for jotting down ideas, developing the outline and characters, saving notes, or anything that I think fits. Often, something will come to me just as I’m dozing off at night, and I’ll have to force myself to get up to write it down. For a time, I had a small journal and pen by the bed for that purpose. Although whether or not I can read my drowsy, blindly-penned handwriting the next morning is another matter entirely.

How do you know when a novel or short story is finished? How do you know to step away and let the story speak for itself?

When the loose ends have been tied, and the act has come to a conclusive end that . . . feels right. Definitive. I may leave the future open-ended, but as I said earlier, not on a note that makes a sequel obligatory. That said, an author can’t lead the reader on some meandering course so that everything is neatly spoken for well after the final act has closed. I don’t think anyone wants a long-winded epilogue. A vague response, I realize, but I’m afraid that’s the best I can give.

Do you have a preference for ebook or paperback format? This is for both your own reading and your novels.

Maybe I’m old-fashioned, but I prefer print for everything. You won’t find me in any anti-digital revolution, though. I support e-books; I just don’t like them. The smell of vanilla you get with aged paper is intoxicating, and the texture of the pages is downright toothsome.

Digital content is tied to batteries—even the long-lasting batteries of some of the simpler e-readers. What’s more, I can pick up a book that was written 50 years ago and it will read the same as the day it was printed. Digital content doesn’t come with any promises, beyond what you can back up on your HDD if possible. Technology changes, formats are left behind, and a great many digital-only books will undoubtedly be lost in either the transitions or the aftermath of a company halting support. E-books have earned their place in the market, but they are not a reliable long-term medium.

Social media is a big thing, much to my disgust! How does managing media outlets come into marketing your brand and your books?

I feel you, Rosemarie. Social media doesn’t appeal to me either. But you do what you must, and that calls for social media these days. I try to keep a presence on Twitter, Tumblr, Facebook, and Reddit. Twitter comes easiest, as its character limit encourages less involved updates. Generally, I try to keep folks updated while maintaining a healthy balance of other posts. No one wants to hear about your book every day. I don’t care what marketers are telling you to do. That rude as far as I’m concerned. The only exception would be around launch or a limited-time affair.

For my social media in particular, I post birds and images related to Sasanian Iran. Birdwatching is something of a hobby of mine, and it’s something I can share with my followers which is light and easy to appreciate. Rather than posting facts about Sasanian Iran (the setting of A Star-Reckoner’s Lot), I’ve discovered that people respond better to images. Photos and art are more interesting after all. So birds, history, and some gaming, too. Oh, and my cat. That’s a given.

You have answered other sets of interview questions, is there something you wish someone would have asked you? Or conversely, something you wish they hadn’t asked?

I wish you hadn’t asked about my imaginary next novel! Kidding. I don’t mind. It would have been nice to have more questions tailored to A Star-Reckoner’s Lot. Questions about Sasanian Iran, perhaps, especially considering how unfamiliar people are with the empire. Or about the protagonist’s plight. Maybe her grief, or her illness, or the supporting characters. Or star-reckoning. There’s a great deal to discuss.

But I would not expect as much, because book bloggers are busy. And I appreciate the opportunity you and other bloggers are giving me in interviewing me at all. So I would not look a gift interview in the questions. Thank you for having me, and may the stars never lead you astray.

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Review: Iris Johansen & Roy Johansen – The Naked Eye

The Naked Eye
Iris Johansen & Roy Johansen

Colby should be safely dead, but Kendra can’t shake the conviction that the guesome serial killer is just biding his time hidden somewhere. Drawn to murder scene after murder scene, it seems like Kendra might be too close this time to avoid being pulled into the scandal surrounding her work. How can she protect everyone?

23014581Kendra! I love you! I love you every time I read you. You’re plucky, irritating, and yet becoming more human all the time. I do wish you weren’t so stubborn, you should know that your friends will go first, but ah well. Everyone has their blind spots right? [How punny!]

The novel is going to catch you, pull you in, and keep you reading all night long. Or all work day long if you are guilty old me. The plot introduces a couple more characters of direct interest to the reader  so you don’t get too bored with her rather uptight point of view.

Ooh, that ending! I can’t even begin to imagine what the next and final novel is going to be like. The first three have been linked (Close Your Eyes, Sight Unseen) but the next one has got to have something new in it…

Even just in returning to the first page to check the publication date lead me to want to reread the first chapter. Guilty confession here, I did reread that little bit. Just so I could love her again. So this will be 5 stars, and maybe I should go back and re-star the others…

5star

Macmillan Australia | September 2016 | $9.99 AU | ebook

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Review: Peter James – Love You Dead

Love You Dead
Peter James

There is a Black Widow on the loose – having first turned to plastic surgery to make her beautiful, all that remains for Jodie Danforth to make herself rich by marrying a rich man. She isn’t all that excited about remaining married though – and she kills them off almost as fast as she gets married.

27993438There is no need to have read the 11 books in the Roy Grace series before this. Other reviewers have complained that it took ages for the Detective to enter the story – I didn’t miss this because I didn’t know what to expect of him. I actually loved being in the mind of the ‘Black Widow’ and the other criminals.

I liked the criminals. I perhaps liked them more than the Detective himself! I was excited to get inside their thoughts and experience things. I actually sympathised with the petty house thief the most and wished he could have gotten straight before, well, dying.

If you have a thing for reptiles and interesting poisons, the thing you’re going to love about this novel is the reptile room. I would have loved to learn more about the poisons, but there are still limits on facts you can include in a novel, even one this large.

I really enjoyed reading this novel, and would have given it 5 stars, had it not been that I was reading a Iris & Roy Johansen crime novel with my favourite heroine Kendra at the same time. All in all, this was ‘just’ another crime novel, albeit a very well written and researched one. I’m certainly not going to turn down other novels by Peter James!

4star

Pan Macmillan | 26 July 2016 | AU $29.99 | Paperback

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Review: Josephine Angelini – Firewalker

Firewalker
Witches Do Not Die Quietly
Josephine Angelini

Lily survived fueling her army but is left covered with burns back in her own world with only one mechanic to save her. Good thing that mechanic is Rowan, and he knows how to deal with her not-so-crazy-after-all mother and her supportive sister. When others in her original world are drawn to her for her power, Lily must make a very difficult decision to save her own life and theirs.

25394030Lily is very… cold. I found it difficult to empathise with her because she seemed unchanged by deaths she had caused. Is it simply a side effect of being a witch? Or is it something else about her character that makes her too much like Lillian. They are the same person after all. I don’t think it was all about Lillian manipulating Lily, much as Rowan wanted to blame her.

Carrick, you are wonderfully twisted and I could have heard more from you. Maybe I’m slowly becoming a convert to multiple points of view in a novel… No, not really. It’s just that I needed more than just what I got from Lily to see what the ‘bad guys’ were doing.

I wished that Samantha had been able to find another Rowan in her own world. I wanted to know what had gone on there. Additionally, I wanted to know what had happened to Juliet and Samantha in the old-world. I can’t say too much here without giving away the novel, but you will understand once you read it yourself (I highly recommend it).

Gobble gobble. I couldn’t read this fast enough. And when I finished it, I really regretted reading these two novels without the third and final novel in the trilogy being published! I need it! I can’t wait for it to come and seal up all those odd occurrences for me. 5 stars from me.

5star

Pan Macmillan | 8 September 2015 | AU $16.99 | Paperback

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Interview with Dane Cobain

Dane CobainAn Interview with Dane Cobain – author and poet.

I’m going to be reviewing your newest novel, but from your other published novels, is there one that is your own personal favourite?

That’s a tricky one. I often use the analogy of my books being like vital organs – you can’t pick just one because they’re all needed to keep you going. I suppose Eyes Like Lighthouses When the Boats Come Home is the most personal one, but I wouldn’t say I have a favourite.

I both love and hate novels that don’t leave a discrete ending for the reader. Have you ever felt the need to write sequels?D3292D29-9D0D-44C9-8564-920899BC4FD4

Funnily enough, although historically I’ve always written standalones, I’ve just started work on a series of detective novels. So there will be sequels coming soon!

There’s always another novel in the pipeline to write… Tell me about it! Does it have even a working title?

Yep, always! Well, I’m around 15,000 words into the first draft of the first detective novel, which is currently titled Driven. The second book in that series is called Netflix and Kill, the third book doesn’t have a title yet but it does at least have the starting point for the story line, and there’s also a standalone idea that I have that has the working title of Greebos.

Some advice other writers have given is that your first novel is best sitting in a drawer for a while, because then you feel stronger about chopping up ‘your baby’. Do you still have a copy of your first novel? Whether this was published or unpublished, I need to know!

It’s good advice. The first novel I wrote was called Annie, and I still have it on my hard drive, as well as in printed form and in its original hand-written manuscript form. I wrote that ten years ago, when I was seventeen and I didn’t really know what I was doing, and it’s definitely not fit for full publication. And then there’s No Rest for the Wicked, my first release – there was a period of five years or so between its first draft and final publication, and it underwent multiple rounds of editing.

DA9E396C-0840-4C86-91A3-CE21D2883CA4Do you have a dedicated writing space? How does it meet your writing needs?

I live alone in an apartment, and so my living room doubles up as my writing studio. It means I can sit back on my sofa with my feet up on a foot stool, watching Netflix on the big screen whilst typing away on my desktop computer, right beside it. It’s comfortable, which means I can quite happily plug away for 16 hours a day over the weekend if I need to.

What is your writing process? Have you ever thought about changing it? Other authors I have interviewed talk about having an outline – post-it notes in an office, or writing in paper journals. Is there something like that in your writing technique? Or is it all digital for you?

I have a specific writing routine that I won’t go into here because it takes a long time to explain it, but it seems to work for me. I don’t change it, but I do adapt it from time to time. As for planning, I usually plan outlines and on my cigarette breaks at work while writing in my notebook. From there, I create character profiles, put it all into a document and print it out, so that I have a physical copy of it all to refer to when writing. The rest of my writing is done at a computer, but I only started doing that recently; I still have hand-written manuscripts for my earlier books.

How do you know when a novel or short story is finished? How do you know to step away and let the story speak for itself?

I have it all planned out before I start writing, and so I know when I’m finished because I get to the end of the last scene in the last chapter. As for stepping away from it, I think that working with an editor helps that – it’s less that you step away, and more that they step in and tell you what works and what doesn’t.

Do you have a preference for ebook or paperback format? This is for both your own reading and your novels.C836DAB1-50A6-4486-8DDE-794D30F54F3E-1

I always prefer physical books. I only read physical copies and keep them all when I’ve finished reading them; I have about 1,000 books in my house at the moment, most of them read.

Social media is becoming a big thing. How does managing media outlets come into marketing your brand and your books?

I’d argue that it’s no longer becoming a big thing because it’s already become one. I work in social media marketing by day, and so I find that it’s one of the best marketing tools that I have at my disposal. But there are all sorts of other marketing methods that I rely on, too. Events tend to do pretty well!

You have answered other sets of interview questions, is there something you wish someone would have asked you? Or conversely, something you wish they hadn’t asked?

Not that I can think of – I always find it interesting to see the questions that people come up with.

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Review: Isobelle Carmody – Scatterlings

Scatterlings
Isobelle Carmody

Merlin wakes with no personal memory of who she is, just a jumble of memories that point to a world that seems long gone. A journey that should seem simple enough in order to find answers turns out to be fraught with dangers that have not yet been explored by anyone.

25956231There is no feeling of Merlin as a character as she begins simply as a construction of impersonal memories. The novel is plot based, and moves at a relatively fast pace once Merlin encounters other inhabitants of the desolate world. As long as you read this lightly without too many preconceived notions of how an apocalyptic novel should go, you will enjoy it.

Perhaps oddly, the female character on the front of the novel reminds me of Isobelle herself. It’s the free-flowing red hair and the slightly otherworldly skin. I also take issue with the male character that is Ford who should by rights be missing an eye.

Again and again in Carmody’s fiction we see her preoccupation with the many ways humans can destroy the earth. In Obernewtyn, we see what could happen after a complete nuclear disaster. In Alyzon Whitestarr, a sickness rises and contaminates people to create hatred. Here is the outcome of

Other reviewers have ripped this novel apart for simply reusing apocalyptic world atrocities and not bothering to make sense of the characters. They seem to forget that this is a relatively early novel and it is now more than 20 years old. I’d have to say it would have been a ground breaker novel in its time. People continue to put their heads in the sand about Global Warming and the mess that humanity will never be able to extract itself from.

I owned this novel for many years without reading it. After meeting Isobelle Carmody twice in the space of a month, I got this novel signed. Then it came to rest on my direct to-be-read pile as a personal choice novel. I feel strongly about all Isobelle Carmody books in giving them positive 5 star reviews. This one is no exception.

5star

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Interview with Jasper Smithey

Author Image

An Interview with Jasper Smithey, author of Lion’s Heart & Lemongrass

Everyone has a ‘first novel’, even if many of them are a rough draft relegated to the bottom and back of your desk drawer (or your external harddrive!). Have you been able to reshape yours, or have you abandoned it for good?

Actually, yes, I am still in the process of revising my first novel, even though I started it thirteen years ago, and I hope to be releasing it in the next year or two. I don’t think I could ever abandon it.

Some authors are able to pump out a novel a year and still be filled with inspiration. Is this the case for you, or do you like to let an idea percolate for a couple of years in order to get a beautiful novel?

Ideas rule the world, and I have to admit that the best ideas stand the test of time by simmering in the back of my mind years before landing on the written page. Nonetheless, I carry on a full-time career, where I engage daily in legal writing, and I have a wife and a twenty month old little girl who both occupy a great deal of my time. I squeeze my fiction writing in between those parts of my life, where father time is more of the culprit than the muses of inspiration.

I have heard of writers that could only write in one place – then that cafe closed down and they could no longer write! Where do you find yourself writing most often, and on what medium (pen/paper or digital)?8bccc8_3525c84e8aea4416b544be9e5717ed96

I enjoy writing predominantly in gardens (especially botanical gardens), parks, and any place with the sound of running water, although I also find my self having to write in the car between destinations or on my patio at home. As for the medium in which I write, it is always with pen and paper. Call me old fashioned or an old soul–the physical connection between the mind, the hand, and the paper draws out the best in me.

Before going on to hire an editor, most authors use beta-readers. How do you recruit your beta-readers? Are you lucky enough to have loving family members who can read and comment on your novel?

My beta-readers and editors are often my old writing group pals, former classmates–we stick together–and bloggers who volunteer their reading time. I have been fortunate enough to have tremendous support for my writing, although neither my wife nor many in my family are avid readers. I am not sure how that happened.

I walk past bookshops and am drawn in by the smell of the books – ebooks simply don’t have the same attraction for me. Does this happen to you, and do you have a favourite bookshop? Or perhaps you are an e-reader fan… where do you source most of your material from?

I am ambivalent about books and ebooks. I love the convenience of ebooks for both space and storage and find bookbub.com a great source of ebooks, but at the same time, I love dust covers and books for their traditional artwork, the feel of paper in my fingers, the scent of old books, and the words on a fixed page. I guess I’m straddling the fence and need to pick a side.

I used to find myself buying books in only one genre (fantasy) before I started writing this blog. What is your favourite genre, and do you have a favourite author who sticks in your mind from any of your life’s stages?

The fantasy genre (and all its subgenres from complete other worlds to urban fantasies and everything in between) still remain my first love, but I also enjoy well written mystery novels, SciFi novels, historical novels, short stories, and poetry as well as literary classics from the 19th century, 17th century French literature, Medieval Italian literature. As for authors whose works I adore and have stuck in my mind, I would say I loved all the Mrs. Pickerell books by Ellen MacGregor in my childhood, I enjoyed the mastery of J. K. Rowling’s storytelling in my young adulthood, and the writings of David Gregory have piqued my interest in adulthood.

Social media is a big thing, much to my disgust! I never have enough time myself to do what I feel is a good job. You manage your own profile – what is your preferred platform and how much time do you spend doing it? Do you enjoy doing it?

I manage my own profile for the time being, a necessity really since I am just beginning to enter the professional writing world. Initially, it took weeks to create an author’s website, but now that I have established it, I find it does not take large amounts of time to keep it current. I would call the website my preferred platform and I don’t mind maintaining it, almost enjoy it sometimes.

I prefer a telephone call over a text, a letter over an email, and a play over a movie. The world advances though by leaps and bounds everyday, and social media has it place among it. Therefore, I do use social media to promote my works: websites, readers blogs, online retailers, and even Facebook. As times change, so must we change and social media holds tremendous power in reaching many individuals in short amounts of time.

Answering interview questions can often take a long time! Tell me, are you ever tempted to recycle your answers from one to the next? 

Of course! If I receive the same question, I do strive to provide a consistent response. Nevertheless, I generally find that my replies to questions about my books or life, although all similar in wording, hold a common thread to them. Plus, I often forget where I stored my prior responses and have to craft new ones for questions anyway.

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